Browsing articles from "December, 2010"

Naughty Dynamic & the Design

Dec 13, 2010   //   by admin   //   Events  //  Comments Off on Naughty Dynamic & the Design

Title: Naughty Dynamic & the Design
Description: Naughty Dynamic & the Design brings us a soulful, powerful mix of covers and originals ranging from modern rock to r&b, funk, and soul. Powerhouse female vocals and an irresistible groove and beat bring the sound into an unstoppable force that, whether delivered acoustic or electric, pulls you inexorably into the rhythm.

Listen at www.myspace.com/naughtydynamicandthedesign.

The show starts at 8pm/$5.

Buy your tickets at the door or reserve your spot now by clicking below:

Date: 2010-12-17

Americana

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on Americana

Americana
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Americana refers to artifacts of the culture of the United States. Examples of this culture include baseball, apple pie, jazz, Superman, the Diner, George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, the music of Aaron Copland (notably his Fanfare for the Common Man), and American folk art, such as that of Norman Rockwell.

In music, Americana is a loose subset of American folk music, that is perhaps best defined as “classic American music”—ranging in style from roots-based bluegrass to alternative country, blues, zydeco, and other native forms. Americana music is the focus of the bi-monthly U.S. magazine No Depression. One of the main reasons Americana is used to describe such a wide variety of musical genres is because of the diverse range of cultural influences which we call American. For example, traditional Bluegrass instrumentation consists of the banjo which originated on the African continent, guitars from Europe, and fiddling styles which have their roots in traditional Irish and other Gaelic fiddling techniques. The 1960s group The Band is often cited as the biggest modern influence on Americana, especially in rock and roll.

In the visual fine arts, Americana usually indicates a concern with the marginal aspects of historic American culture; carnivals, popular amusements such as side-shows, vernacular typography and signage, old horror movies in the ‘haunted house’ genre, the old West, and the backwoods cultures. It has increasingly veered off into a dark Gothic approach to Americana that was first visualised by U.S. writers such as Edgar Allan Poe and Ray Bradbury.

Americana is also a small town in the countryside of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. It is notable due to the 1866 influx of American Confederate refugees who fled the Southern U.S., including Senator William H. Morris.

To read the rest of this article..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americana_(music)

American folk music

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on American folk music

The folk music revival is sometimes said to have begun with Pete Seeger. The Weavers, formed in 1947 by Seeger, had a big hit in 1949 with Lead Belly’s “Goodnight, Irene”. This hit was probably one of the first glimmerings of the folk music revival.

Although carried along by a handful of artists releasing records, the folk-music scene’s development was still only as a sort of cult phenomenon in bohemian circles in places like New York City (especially Greenwich Village), North Beach, and in the college and university districts of cities like Boston, Denver, Chicago and elsewhere. It was hip, but not terribly widespread.

In the 1950s and after, acoustic folk-song performance became associated with the coffee houses, private parties, open-air concerts and sing-alongs, and college-campus concerts. It blended, to some degree, with the so-called beatnik scene, and dedicated singers of folk songs (as well as folk-influenced original material) traveled through what was called “the coffee-house circuit” across the U.S. and Canada.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_folk_music_revival

Country music

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on Country music

Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. It has roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, gospel music, and old-time music and evolved rapidly in the 1920s. The term country music began to be used in the 1940s when the earlier term hillbilly music was deemed to be degrading, and the term was widely embraced in the 1970s, while country and Western has declined in use since that time, except in the United Kingdom and Ireland, where it is still commonly used in the United States.

In the Southwestern United States a different mix of ethnic groups created the music that became the Western music of the term country and Western.

Country music has produced two of the top selling solo artists of all time. Elvis Presley, who was known early on as “The Hillbilly Cat” and was a regular on the radio program Louisiana Hayride, went on to become a defining figure in the emerging genre of rock ‘n roll. Contemporary musician Garth Brooks, with 128 million albums sold, is the top-selling solo artist in U.S. history.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_music

Old-time music

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on Old-time music

Old-time music is a form of North American folk music, with roots in the folk musics of many countries, including England, Scotland, Ireland and Africa. This musical form developed along with various North American folk dances, such as square dance, buck dance, and clogging. The genre also encompasses ballads and other types of folk songs. It is played on acoustic instruments, generally centering on a combination of fiddle and plucked string instruments (most often the guitar and, more generally in regions outside of the Northeast U.S. and Canada, banjo).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old-time_music

Jazz

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on Jazz

Jazz is an American musical art form which originated in the beginning of the 20th century in African American communities in the Southern United States from a confluence of African and European music traditions. The style’s West African pedigree is evident in its use of blue notes, improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation, and the swung note.

From its early development until the present, jazz has also incorporated music from 19th and 20th century American popular music. The word jazz began as a West Coast slang term of uncertain derivation and was first used to refer to music in Chicago in about 1915; for the origin and history, see Jazz (word).

Jazz has, from its early 20th century inception, spawned a variety of subgenres, from New Orleans Dixieland dating from the early 1910s, big band-style swing from the 1930s and 1940s, bebop from the mid-1940s, a variety of Latin jazz fusions such as Afro-Cuban and Brazilian jazz from the 1950s and 1960s, jazz-rock fusion from the 1970s and late 1980s developments such as acid jazz, which blended jazz influences into funk and hip-hop.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz_music

Singer-songwriter

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on Singer-songwriter

Singer-songwriter is a term that refers to performers who write, compose and sing their own material including lyrics and melodies. They often provide the sole accompaniment to an entire composition or song, typically using a guitar. The term is also sometimes used for a genre of music that is often performed in this manner. A number of other well-known musicians may write some of their own songs, but are usually referred to as singers instead.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singer_Songwriter

Bluegrass music

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Music Glossary  //  Comments Off on Bluegrass music

Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music, and is a sub-genre of country music. It has its own roots in Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. Bluegrass was inspired by the music of immigrants from the United Kingdom and Ireland (particularly the Scots-Irish immigrants in Appalachia), as well as jazz and blues. In bluegrass, as in jazz, each instrument takes a turn playing the melody and improvising around it, while the others perform accompaniment. This is in contrast to old-time music, in which all instruments play the melody together or one instrument carries the lead throughout while the others provide accompaniment. Traditional bluegrass is typically based around acoustic stringed instruments, such as mandolin, acoustic guitar, banjo, fiddle, and upright bass, with or without vocals.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluegrass_(music)

Grimm’s Fairy Tales: Rapunzel

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Folklore  //  Comments Off on Grimm’s Fairy Tales: Rapunzel

There were once a man and a woman who had long in vain wished for a child. At length the woman hoped that God was about to grant her desire. These people had a little window at the back of their house from which a splendid garden could be seen, which was full of the most beautiful flowers and herbs. It was, however, surrounded by a high wall, and no one dared to go into it because it belonged to an enchantress, who had great power and was dreaded by all the world. One day the woman was standing by this window and looking down into the garden, when she saw a bed which was planted with the most beautiful rampion (rapunzel), and it looked so fresh and green that she longed for it, she quite pined away, and began to look pale and miserable. Then her husband was alarmed, and asked:

“What ails you, dear wife?”

“Ah,” she replied, “if I can’t eat some of the rampion, which is in the garden behind our house, I shall die.”

The man, who loved her, thought: “Sooner than let your wife die, bring her some of the rampion yourself, let it cost what it will.”

At twilight, he clambered down over the wall into the garden of the enchantress, hastily clutched a handful of rampion, and took it to his wife. She at once made herself a salad of it, and ate it greedily. It tasted so good to her–so very good, that the next day she longed for it three times as much as before. If he was to have any rest, her husband must once more descend into the garden. In the gloom of evening therefore, he let himself down again; but when he had clambered down the wall he was terribly afraid, for he saw the enchantress standing before him.

“How can you dare,” said she with angry look, “descend into my garden and steal my rampion like a thief? You shall suffer for it!”

“Ah,” answered he, “let mercy take the place of justice, I only made up my mind to do it out of necessity. My wife saw your rampion from the window, and felt such a longing for it that she would have died if she had not got some to eat.”

Then the enchantress allowed her anger to be softened, and said to him: “If the case be as you say, I will allow you to take away with you as much rampion as you will, only I make one condition, you must give me the child which your wife will bring into the world; it shall be well treated, and I will care for it like a mother.” The man in his terror consented to everything, and when the woman was brought to bed, the enchantress appeared at once, gave the child the name of Rapunzel, and took it away with her.

Rapunzel grew into the most beautiful child under the sun. When she was twelve years old, the enchantress shut her into a tower, which lay in a forest, and had neither stairs nor door, but quite at the top was a little window. When the enchantress wanted to go in, she placed herself beneath it and cried:

“Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your hair to me.”

Rapunzel had magnificent long hair, fine as spun gold, and when she heard the voice of the enchantress she unfastened her braided tresses, wound them round one of the hooks of the window above, and then the hair fell twenty ells down, and the enchantress climbed up by it.

After a year or two, it came to pass that the king’s son rode through the forest and passed by the tower. Then he heard a song, which was so charming that he stood still and listened. This was Rapunzel, who in her solitude passed her time in letting her sweet voice resound. The king’s son wanted to climb up to her, and looked for the door of the tower, but none was to be found. He rode home, but the singing had so deeply touched his heart, that every day he went out into the forest and listened to it. Once when he was thus standing behind a tree, he saw that an enchantress came there, and he heard how she cried:

“Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your hair to me.”

Then Rapunzel let down the braids of her hair, and the enchantress climbed up to her. “If that is the ladder by which one mounts, I too will try my fortune,” said he, and the next day when it began to grow dark, he went to the tower and cried:

“Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your hair to me.”

Immediately the hair fell down and the king’s son climbed up.

At first Rapunzel was terribly frightened when a man, such as her eyes had never yet beheld, came to her; but the king’s son began to talk to her quite like a friend, and told her that his heart had been so stirred that it had let him have no rest, and he had been forced to see her. Then Rapunzel lost her fear, and when he asked her if she would take him for her husband, and she saw that he was young and handsome, she thought: “He will love me more than old Dame Gothel does”; and she said yes, and laid her hand in his.

She said: “I will willingly go away with you, but I do not know how to get down. Bring with you a skein of silk every time that you come, and I will weave a ladder with it, and when that is ready I will descend, and you will take me on your horse.” They agreed that until that time he should come to her every evening, for the old woman came by day.

The enchantress remarked nothing of this, until once Rapunzel said to her: “Tell me, Dame Gothel, how it happens that you are so much heavier for me to draw up than the young king’s son–he is with me in a moment.”

“Ah! you wicked child,” cried the enchantress. “What do I hear you say! I thought I had separated you from all the world, and yet you have deceived me!” In her anger she clutched Rapunzel’s beautiful tresses, wrapped them twice round her left hand, seized a pair of scissors with the right, and snip, snap, they were cut off, and the lovely braids lay on the ground.

And she was so pitiless that she took poor Rapunzel into a desert where she had to live in great grief and misery. On the same day that she cast out Rapunzel, however, the enchantress fastened the braids of hair, which she had cut off, to the hook of the window, and when the king’s son came and cried:

“Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Let down your hair to me.”

She let the hair down. The king’s son ascended, but instead of finding his dearest Rapunzel, he found the enchantress, who gazed at him with wicked and venomous looks. “Aha!” she cried mockingly, “you would fetch your dearest, but the beautiful bird sits no longer singing in the nest; the cat has got it, and will scratch out your eyes as well. Rapunzel is lost to you; you will never see her again.”

The king’s son was beside himself with pain, and in his despair he leapt down from the tower. He escaped with his life, but the thorns into which he fell pierced his eyes. Then he wandered quite blind about the forest, ate nothing but roots and berries, and did naught but lament and weep over the loss of his dearest wife.

Thus he roamed about in misery for some years, and at length came to the desert where Rapunzel, with the twins to which she had given birth, a boy and a girl, lived in wretchedness. He heard a voice, and it seemed so familiar to him that he went towards it, and when he approached, Rapunzel knew him and fell on his neck and wept. Two of her tears wetted his eyes and they grew clear again, and he could see with them as before.

He led her to his kingdom where he was joyfully received, and they lived for a long time afterwards, happy and contented.

~ the end

Annual Holiday Celebration

Dec 12, 2010   //   by admin   //   Events  //  Comments Off on Annual Holiday Celebration

Title: Annual Holiday Celebration
Description: Our annual fundraiser for Rapunzel’s Further Ado Foundation, the 501(c)3 organization responsible for everything that happens on our stage (and around it.) Proceeds help with music licensing fees and operating costs–help keep live music in Lovingston!

Featuring:

  • Adrienne Young
  • Eli Cook
  • Byron Massie
  • Andy Waldeck & Jenn Rhubright
  • Gene & Gayla Mills
  • The Pitch-a-Biscuit String Band
  • Jim & Carol McAvoy
  • The Stump Skunks
  • Erin James
  • Willie Kirschbaum
  • Fata Morgana Bellydance
  • Bent Theatre Comedy Improv
  • Junior Moment
  • Blue O’Connell

…and more!

The show starts at 8pm/$10.

Buy your tickets at the door or reserve your spot now by clicking below:

Or, be there in spirit–donations are tax-deductible!
Start Time: 20:00
Date: 2010-12-18

Pages:12»

Our Customers

Best coffee shop/music venue east of the Mississippi River.

John G.

Join Our Mailing List

like us on facebook too!